Visual Arts News from the Vancouver Art Gallery Library, November 24, 2015

Vancouver

The Flats becomes Vancouver’s pivot point for commercial galleries A few years ago, the city’s commercial gallery district was headquartered on South Granville, a major shopping street that slopes down toward a bridge over False Creek to downtown. But with rents on the rise, galleries – in particular those showing contemporary art – began closing up their west-side storefronts and moving east, where industrial warehouses with their wide-open spaces (and lower price per square foot) beckoned. The Globe and Mail, November 22, 2015.

Calgary

Parker: Van Ginkel capitalizes on artistic talents Too many artists make too little money. Whether they’re painters, dancers, writers or actors, many must get a “real” job to supplement their talents. Paul Van Ginkel has managed to realize a satisfying return on his talent thanks to a strict work ethic, a solid business plan and being relentless in identifying marketing opportunities. Calgary Herald, November 24, 2015.

Toronto

Tamara Jaworska: Tapestry weaver was a Canadian cultural treasure Woven together, the dramatic threads of Tamara Jaworska’s 97-year life create a story as compelling as the tapestries she shaped on her 12-foot loom. Celebrated fibre artist found a safe haven in Canada, which provided themes and images for some of her masterpieces. The Globe and Mail, November 22, 2015.

Kleinburg, Ontario

The fraught and fierce legacy of the McMichaels’ cultural vision Robert and Signe McMichael… paid $250 to the Roberts Gallery in Toronto for an oil sketch on paperboard by Lawren Harris. [On] Nov. 18, 1965…the McMichaels and Ontario’s Conservative government of the day signed an agreement that resulted in the donation to the province of the McMichaels’ 14-room home, their art collection, the adjacent land and a shack previously occupied by Thomson. And it’s this donation that’s being celebrated right now in a lovely anniversary show at the McMichael smartly titled A Foundation for Fifty Years. The Globe and Mail, November 20, 2015.

New York

‘The Work Has No Metaphors’: Agatha Gothe-Snape Pays Cheironomic Homage To Lawrence Weiner Last Wednesday evening at 8 p.m., audience members loosely filled the benches of the very ecclesiastical-looking auditorium inside New York’s Society for Ethical Culture for a performance of Agatha Gothe-Snape’s Performa 15 commission, Rhetorical Chorus (LW). The LW stands for Lawrence Weiner. A press release necessarily discloses, “Rhetorical Chorus (LW) [was] inspired by a chance encounter with legendary conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner that explores the role of the physical body in transmitting and receiving knowledge.” ARTnews, November 23, 2015.

Mystery, Eccentricity, and Gallows Humor: Matthew Weinstein on Mark Manders and H.C. Westermann Mark Manders’s work makes a good argument for banishing the term “contemporary.” It’s a silly term. Unlike “modern,” which projected futures for a range of now-­failed ideologies and left its own archaeology, “contemporary” has no historic potentiality. I admire Manders’s indifference to the contemporary. His work has a solemnity that stands out in an increasingly shrill art world. ARTnews, November 24, 2015.

Richard Phillips on his First-Ever Show on the Lower East Side, and Taking on the Fallout From Playboy Marfa On a recent afternoon in Long Island City, Richard Phillips—who has his first solo show in New York in three years on view at Mathew NYC on the Lower East Side—came to the door of his studio wearing jeans and a leather jacket…Mathew NYC, the New York outpost of a Berlin-based gallery, occupies the barebones tenement space on the Lower East Side once home to 47 Canal, a far cry from any soaring outpost of Gagosian Gallery, the gallery that represents Phillips. ARTnews, November 23, 2015.

To Be Frank: How Old-School Artist Jan Frank Became New Again The painter Jan Frank has a reputation as a hard-drinking, if not hard-fighting, downtown playboy. He is known for his sharp suits and smoky drawl, his alpaca coat, and his fondness for the racetrack…ARTnews, November 24, 2015.

Miami

Miami’s Art World Sets Sights on Little Haiti Neighborhood With gentrification driving artists and galleries out of the Wynwood neighborhood, many are buying property in the predominantly working-class area. “Everybody’s always looking for the next art neighborhood,” mused Tony Cho, standing amid the scrum outside Gallery Diet. Taking in the scene at its opening night party here, he motioned to another new gallery across the street, its neon sign punctuating an otherwise darkened stretch of this city’s Little Haiti neighborhood. “It’s going to happen here.” The New York Times, November 23, 2015.

London

Ukrainian artist recreates sculptures destroyed by pro-Russian separatists The new works, also titled Homo Bulla, are on show at the Saatchi gallery in London as part of an exhibition featuring 30 emerging artists aged between 18 and 35 from the UK and Ukraine (until 3 January). In a performance to mark the opening of the show, a naked Kulikovska smashed up one of her sculptures with a hammer. The Art Newspaper, November 24, 2015.

Netherlands

Mystery of Vermeer’s Little Street in Delft revealed | Art and design … In the 350 or so years since Johannes Vermeer captured the everyday 17th-century Delft scene of The Little Street, one question has remained: where is it? Now a leading Dutch art historian says he knows. The answer, according to Frans Grijzenhout, professor of art history at Amsterdam University, came from trawling through detailed contemporaneous records kept by the city in the southern Netherlands. The Guardian, November 23, 2015.

Tehran

Wim Delvoye goes to Tehran for surprise solo show The Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art will devote its entire space to a display of work by the Belgian artist and conceptual provocateur Wim Delvoye in March. Delvoye has spent much time in Iran during the past three years and is restoring a former palace and school there, which he might open as a gallery, he tells us. The Art Newspaper, November 24, 2015.

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