Arts News from the Vancouver Art Gallery Library, July 15, 2015

Vancouver

Reena Saini Kallat’s Public Art Installation Explores Migration, Longing In Vancouver. Both Mumbai and Vancouver are populated with people who can trace their migrant roots back to cities all over the world. This sense of movement exudes freedom, something that Indian artist Reena Saini Kallat both encompasses, and challenges in her free public art installation “Woven Chronicle” now on display in Vancouver. Huffington Post, July 13, 2015

Edmonton

Edmonton unveils final three Rogers Place public art projects. On Tuesday, the city and the Edmonton Arts Council unveiled the concepts for the final three public artworks to be created as part of the Rogers Place development downtown. The works are: Essential Tree by a Berlin design company called realties:united; Skater’s Arch by Saskatoon artist Douglas Bentham, and; Figures in Motion by St. Albert artist Al Henderson. CBC News, July 14, 2015

Winnipeg

On the Road with Daniel Joyce: Manitoba. “Winnipeg was new to me, and, while I knew of its relative isolation, I had heard its reputation as a centre with many art galleries, strong programming and a history of producing some of Canada’s most talented contemporary artist.” Canadian Art, July 14, 2015

Ottawa

Is the Ottawa Art Gallery now more contemporary, more conceptual? While hobnobbing during an opening at the Ottawa Art Gallery a few weeks ago, I overheard someone say, “This place has really built itself up as a centre for contemporary art in the past few years. Ottawa Citizen, July 14, 2015

Toronto

Simon Cole Reflects on Cooper Cole’s Dupont Move. Cooper Cole Gallery recently unveiled its inaugural exhibition, “Road to Ruin,” at its new, renovated location at Dupont and Dufferin Streets. The gallery’s move is the latest in a steady northward migration out of the west end Queen West/Ossington/Dundas art zone, where the gallery evolved from its beginnings as street-art focused Show and Tell Gallery. Canadian Art, July 14, 2015

Peterborough

Art gallery ready to move back to Little Lake after temporary stay on George St. during renovations. After a temporary stay in an office building on George St., the Art Gallery of Peterborough is heading home. Peterborough Examiner, July 14, 2015

Cape Dorset

Kenojuak Cultural Centre Gains Momentum. To bring Cape Dorset’s facilities in line with its production and reputation, the West Baffin Eskimo Cooperative plans to build the Kenojuak Cultural Centre and Print Shop. Slated to open in 2017, the $10.2 million, 10,440 square-foot building will offer space for meetings and activities, exhibitions and print production. Canadian Art, July 13, 2015

Detroit

Why Did Detroit File Felony Charges Against Celebrity Street Artist Shepard Fairey “This is exactly what he wants. He wears his warrants on his sleeve like badges of honor. He’s using the judicial system and the media to market himself. It’s a minor investment and in return his name stays relevant. He’s been doing this for years, and he’s great at it.” Detroit Free Press, July 14, 2015

New York

Walther Collection brings African photographers to New York The German-based Walther Collection is launching a three-part series of exhibitions in its New York project space focusing on emerging African photographers and video artists. The shows will run between 2015 and 2017. The Art Newspaper, July 15, 2015

Philadelphia

A Street Artist Spends A Year Inside Philly’s Giant Mural Machine RJ Rushmore: “A year inside of ‘Philadelphia’s community-engagement juggernaut’” – that’s the city’s famous Mural Arts Program – “has taught me a lot. It’s made me fall deeper in love with street art than ever before, and it’s also helped me to better understand the medium’s shortcomings. Here are a few observations.” Vandalog, July 1, 2015

London

Artist Imi Knoebel: ‘If you want to stay alive, you have to do something radical’ . Now one of Germany’s leading artists, whose first London show opens this week, Imi Knoebel says he will never forget his tortuous early attempts, in his 20s, to make art. “I thought: everything has been done already,” the 74-year-old tells the Guardian in his first ever newspaper interview. The Guardian, July 15, 2015

British Museum could send loans worth £1bn to the Gulf Finest Assyrian relief from Nimrud among objects being valued for possible display in Abu Dhabi museum. The Art Newspaper, July 15, 2015

Manchester

Turner Prize-winning artist Douglas Gordon goes on axe rampage after receiving poor reviews. Douglas Gordon, who became the first video artist to win the Turner, reportedly used a prop from a play he wrote and directed based on Little Red Riding Hood to damage Manchester’s HOME theatre. The Independent, July 15, 2015

Madrid

Royal Tapestry Factory in Madrid due to file for bankruptcy Board members say they will do all they can to save historic company in crisis. The Art Newspaper, July 15, 2015

Milan

Leonardo Da Vinci Invented A Refrigerator “The design, which has been dated to around 1492, included both a drawing of the machine and a theoretical explanation of how it would work … It was likely designed for drinks, or perhaps sorbets and desserts, the report says.” BBC, July 10, 2015

International

A Bubble That Can’t Burst (And That’s Okay): Peter Schjeldahl On Today’s Art Market “Today’s art craze is baked into the global economy – not a local cyclone but a climate change caused by belching emissions of excess money that won’t stop while the carbon of present mega-wealth holds out. That is, art prices can crash only as one piddling consequence of a planetary catastrophe. … Sensing that people will one day look back on this era as a freakish episode in cultural history, why not get a head start on viewing it that way? Detach and marvel.” The New Yorker, July 13, 2015

How A Picasso Got To Be Worth $179 Million Les Femmes d’Alger (Version “O”) was born out of a rivalry between Picasso and Henri Matisse. But competition can evolve into adoration, and when Matisse died on November 3, 1954, Picasso embarked upon an ambitious form of mourning: He would make a series of 15 works in homage to Eugène Delacroix’s 1834 painting Les Femmes d’Alger, a work held in near-religious regard by the late artist. New York Magazine, July 13, 2015

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