Visual Arts News from the Vancouver Art Gallery Library, June 4, 2015

Vancouver

Geoffrey Farmer, Begin, Begin Again. Spanning the past 15 years of Geoffrey Farmer’s career, How Do I Fit this Ghost Inside My Mouth is an exhibition brimming with multiple pasts, presents and futures. The installations throughout the second floor of the Vancouver Art Gallery are brought to life by Farmer’s intricate understanding of colour, atmosphere and sound. Farmer melts time and converges histories. Vancouver is Awesome, June 2, 2015

Art from the archive: Washing cars to raise money to restore Emily Carrs. When I first came across the photo [from 1978], it didn’t make sense that it was in file for the Vancouver Art Gallery. What, I wondered, has a bunch of people washing a classic old car got to do with art? I had to read the caption explaining the photo to understand why. It was there because it was supposed to show a Carr Wash. It was an art pun. In the summer of 1978, the Vancouver Art Gallery Association decided to wash cars to raise money to restore some Emily Carr works. In the process of doing that, someone came up with the clever idea of calling it a Carr Wash. Art Seen, Vancouver Sun (Blog), June 3, 2015

Architect Bruno Freschi set to show the drawings and paintings that have driven his work. An upcoming show at the Waterfall Gallery offers an inside look at the inspiration that drives local architect Bruno Freschi. Freschi is best known as chief architect for Expo 86 and designer of both the Agha Khan mosque in Burnaby and the dome we now know as Telus Science World. Georgia Straight, June 1, 2015

Surrey

Philippine Independence Day art exhibit celebrates freedom in Surrey. Filipino-Canadian artists are showcasing their works as part of this year’s community celebration of Philippine Independence Day. The exhibit’s opening reception will be held Thursday (June 4) at 6 p.m. at the Surrey Arts Centre. Georgia Straight, June 3, 2015

Kelowna

Nude painting Dark Girl has schools warning parents in Kelowna, B.C. A painting of a nude woman is causing problems for B.C.’s Kelowna Art Gallery, apparently prompting nearby schools to warn parents and suggest it be covered up for student visits. The painting, called Dark Girl by Canadian artist Prudence Heward, was painted in 1935 and is part of an exhibition of rare paintings from the University of Toronto called A Story of Canadian Art, which runs until July 19. CBC News, June 3, 2015

Saskatoon

Combining art gallery with a conservatory was a key to success. The Mendel Art Gallery got its start in 1960 when meatpacking mogul Fred Mendel proposed a $20,000 donation to a municipal project to mark Intercontinental Packers’ 20th anniversary. Star Phoenix, June 4, 2015

Toronto

Party at the ROM and the AGO. To get — and keep — you in their cultural clutches, the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Royal Ontario Museum have been throwing wild bashes in their hallowed halls since 2012. The AGO’s First Thursdays and the ROM’s Friday Night Live are huge in scale, attract an under 40 crowd and both frequently sell out. But they’re also unmistakably distinct. Dinos or Degas? Check out our user’s guide to find the best blowout for you. Toronto Star, June 3, 2015

Ottawa

Canada Council remade: Six new ways to distribute $154M to artists. As of 2017, those “147 discipline-based programs” will be replaced by “six national, non-disciplinary programs:” Arts Across Canada; Arts Abroad; Engage and Sustain; Creating, Knowing and Sharing Aboriginal Arts; Explore and Create; and Renewing Artistic Practice. Ottawa Citizen, June 3, 2015

Windsor

Joseph Chimczuk museum becomes reality at Windsor art gallery. The new museum space being created on the first floor of the art gallery will bear the Chimczuk name. Joseph Chimczuk died 24 years ago, and left the City of Windsor $1 million in his will. CBC News, June 3, 2015

Halifax

Five finalists named for $50,000 Sobey Art Award. Perhaps this year’s best-known finalist is Winnipeg photo-based artist Sarah Anne Johnson, 39. Another repeat nominee is Halifax-based multidisciplinary artist Lisa Lipton, 35, named to the Sobey long list in 2012 and 2013. Montreal’s Jon Rafman, 34, perhaps best known for his presentation of found images from Google Street View, was long-listed last year. Newcomers to the short list are Tehran-born Abbas Akhavan, 38, a multidisciplinary artist (video, installation, drawing, sculpture, performance) and Raymond Boisjoly, 34, a Vancouver-based artist of Haida and Québécois descent whose work engages “issues of indigeneity … and the experiential aspects of materiality.” Globe & Mail, June 3, 2015

Know Your Sobey Art Award Finalists. Lisa Lipton (Atlantic), Jon Rafman (Quebec), Abbas Akhavan (Ontario), Sarah Anne Johnson (Prairies and the North) and Raymond Boisjoly (West Coast and the Yukon) will be considered for the prize, which will be announced on October 28. $50,000 will go to the winner with $10,000 awarded to the other finalists and $500 to the longlisted artists. Canadian Art, June 3, 2015

Boston

Boston Public Library Director Resigns after Dürer and Rembrandt Works Vanish from Collection Artforum, June 4, 2-15

The Brooklyn Museum’s Dynamic New Director Has Big Plans As visionary, ambitious, and successful as Anne Pasternak’s programming has been at Creative Time, it’s a leap, to say the least, for her to assume leadership of the encyclopedic Brooklyn Museum, which has a staff of more than three hundred and fifty and resides in a five-story McKim, Mead & White building, whose oldest bits date back to 1893. The New Yorker, June 2, 2015

New York

The New Whitney: “A Giddy, Irrational Space For Spectacle” “It is said that museums have gone from “being about something” to “being for somebody,” racing to shed their old skins and remaking themselves in our image. So all museums must now become revisions, articulated interventions and reinterpretations of their former selves and their place in the cultural world—a compulsion now embraced by the new Whitney. New Criterion, June 2015

Frick Museum Abandons Controversial Expansion Plan “It just became clear to us that it wasn’t going to work,” said a museum official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the board had not yet made the decision final with a vote. New York Times, June 3, 2015

Artist invites public to help build Lego New York cityscape. The Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson has brought his participatory installation “The collectivity project” to New York’s High Line, with the public encouraged to envision an imaginary cityscape out of white Lego blocks. CTV News, June 4, 2015

MoMA staff protest wage and healthcare cuts Contract negotiations continue between the museum and its employees. The Art Newspaper, June 3, 2015

Museum Workers Versus The Museum Of Modern Art To be clear, this isn’t a group of laborers that are raking in massive amounts of cash. According to a press release sent out by the union prior to the demonstration, the salary of “entry-level museum staff starts at approximately $29K per year and the membership, which includes professional staff such as curators, librarians and conservators, averages $49K.” The Daily Beast, June 3, 2015

London

Gambling millionaire bets on YBA works 04 June 2015 David Walsh to sell Chris Ofili’s The Holy Virgin Mary along with pieces by Chapman Brothers, Damien Hirst and Jenny Saville. The Art Newspaper, June 4, 2015

Paris

Anish Kapoor’s Versailles ‘vagina’ causes controversy in France. The celebrated artist Anish Kapoor’s giant “vagina” at the Palace of Versailles is causing handwringing debate in France before it even opens to the public. Guardian, June 4, 2015

Helsinki

Nordic Generation SIC Gallery / Helsinki SIC Gallery is a space for contemporary art founded in Helsinki, Finland, in 2012, by artists Olli Keränen, Karri Kuoppala, Muriel Kuoppala, Kalle Leino, Maija Luutonen, Konsta Ojala, Sauli Sirviö, Timo Vaittinen, and Laura Wesamaa, all born between 1976 and 1982. Flash Art, June 3, 2015

International

Photo Essay: Why the highrise is the future for an urbanized planet. How do the people who live inside create community, art and meaning? The first major HIGHRISE documentary, called Out My Window , goes inside 13 highrises in 13 global cities to find out how the view looks from inside. Globe & Mail, June 3, 2015

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