Visual Arts News from the Vancouver Art Gallery Library, May 15, 2014

North Vancouver

Sculpture of Capilano president removed from campus over harassment allegation George Rammell, an art instructor at a B.C. university, says one of his works is being held hostage until he complies with demands that it never be returned to campus, but school officials say the extremely unflattering sculpture of the university’s president amounts to workplace harassment. Globe & Mail, May 15,2014

Richmond

Evan Lee’s Elders and Roots works around photography. “Critics have observed that Evan Lee does not work with photography but around it, exploring its social, technical, and conceptual possibilities. His new exhibition, Elders and Roots, at the Richmond Art Gallery, brings together “camera-less” colour photographs of ginseng roots, made using a desktop scanner; graphite drawings of elderly women, based on photographs shot by the artist; and a black-and-white video of a white-bearded worker on a construction site, composed of a sequence of still photos, again taken by the artist.” Georgia Straight, May 14, 2014

Victoria

Exhibit links evolution of art to Lewis Carroll classic. Lee Plested might be jetlagged and sleep-deprived, but he perks up at first mention of his whimsical exhibition. “Follow me,” the Vancouver-based curator says with a wide grin. “I’ll show you Through the Looking-Glass.” Plested uses the literary theme as a structural device to explore the modernist works in the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria’s permanent collection and the way they’ve influenced local contemporary artists. Times Colonist, May 14, 2014

Winnipeg

WAG exhibition captures 40-year career of late photographer. Between Something and Nothing, currently at the WAG and co-organized by the National Gallery in Ottawa, brings together 40 years of Lynne Cohen’s work. Key features of what would become her formula are already evident in early, intimately-scaled black-and-white images from the ’70s and ’80s. The same straight-ahead viewing angles, total absence of people and disquieting stillness carry through to the larger, more immersive colour prints she made starting in the ’90s. Winnipeg Free Press, May 15, 2014

Toronto

Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens on Non-Doing in Art. When artist Rodrigo Marti introduced me to a project he was participating in—a residency at Toronto’s Trinity Square Video, where he had been invited expressly for the purposes of not making work—my interest was immediately piqued. Itching to find my way into Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens’s strange proposition about un-productive artistic labour, I was propelled by an almost morbid curiosity: If they were intent on not producing artwork, what would they ultimately show? Canadian Art, May 14, 2014

Ottawa

Supreme Court ruling in favour of artists’ rights paints National Gallery into tight corner. Canada’s artists enjoyed a major legal victory Wednesday when, in a surprisingly fast decision, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the National Gallery of Canada was obliged to negotiate minimum fees with the artists whose work it exhibits. Ottawa Citizen, May 14, 2014

Updated: Artists Win Appeal Against National Gallery of Canada Today, CARFAC and RAAV—two non-profit organizations that represent Canada’s professional visual artists—won their appeal against the National Gallery of Canada in the Supreme Court of Canada. The unanimous decision from a panel of judges was made just a few hours after the appeal hearing began this morning. Canadian Art, May 14, 2014

Halifax

NSCAD Appoints New President Dianne Taylor-Gearing. NSCAD University in Halifax has announced the appointment of Dianne Taylor-Gearing as president. Taylor-Gearing, a UK citizen, is currently vice-president research and academic affairs at the Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary. Achievements include the approval of ACAD’s first grad program, a Master of Fine Arts in Craft Media, the introduction of a new academic structure with the appointment of four academic chairs, and accessing funding for new “2+2” programs between ACAD and other Alberta colleges. Canadian Art, May 14, 2014

Galisteo, New Mexico

Lucy R. Lippard discusses her latest book Lucy R. Lippard’s latest book, Undermining: A Wild Ride Through Land Use, Politics, and Art in the Changing West, pinpoints vexing environmental issues, such as gravel pits and fracking, and contextualizes them within a spectrum of larger problems, while also considering histories of the West, photography, adobe buildings, ruins, Land art, and more. Here she speaks about the origins and inspirations of her book—which was published recently by the New Press—and she reflects on the leftover questions that arose from the project. Artforum, May 12, 2014

Pittsburgh

Rearranging Warhol’s Legacy The reorganized Andy Warhol Museum dedicates as much attention to Warhol’s role in pop culture as it does to his celebrated art. New York Times, May 15, 2014

New York

The Searing Blues of the 9/11 Sky Like many people who were in any proximity to the events of Sept. 11, the artist Spencer Finch often thought later about the color of the sky that day, the kind of crystalline blue that pilots and meteorologists call “severe clear.” New York Times, May 15, 2014

The Critic Who Saved The New York Public Library Wall Street Journal architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable’s was “one of the first comprehensive critiques to appear in the mainstream media, and it didn’t so much run as detonate. At a stroke it shifted the ground of the debate from the library’s “What” to the critics’ “Why?”—galvanizing the opposition and establishing itself as the touchstone for all subsequent discussions of the issue, whatever side you were on.” Wall Street Journal, May 15, 2014

Warhol Paintings Pull In $103.9M At Blockbuster Christie’s Auction Race Riot sold for $62.9 million and White Marilyn drew $41 million – and there were works by Newman, Rothko and Bacon that went for even more in an evening that brought in a total of $744.9 million. New York Times, May 15, 2014

After Two Christie’s Auctions Top Expectations, Pace of Sales Slows at Sotheby’s After two consecutive nights of sky’s-the-limit bidding, Sotheby’s sale of contemporary art started out on a high, but quickly fell back to earth, with picky buyers passing up paintings and sculptures by major figures like Rothko, de Kooning and Takashi Murakami. New York Times, May 15, 2014

Philadelphia

Philadelphia’s Newest Art Venue Is A Railroad Corridor A very heavily traveled corridor, too: the track between North Philadelphia and 30th Street Station. Big swathes of the blighted landscape that commuters usually see out their windows are now covered with washes and patterns of hot pink, brilliant orange and white or neon green. The Atlantic, May 14, 2014

Family and Church Feud Over an Eakins The family of a Catholic priest who was painted by Thomas Eakins is trying to stop the portrait’s sale by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, saying the church does not own it. New York Times, May 15, 2014

United States

Are U.S. Art Museums Finally Taking Latin American Art Seriously? When it comes to museum shows, the largest ethnic minority in the country has come a long way–maybe. ARTnews, May 15, 2014

London

A parting gift from a friend The largest private collection of works by Frank Auerbach has been given to the nation in lieu of inheritance tax from Lucian Freud’s estate. The Art Newspaper, May 15, 2014

Tate makes Rothko-defacing ink disappear One of the artist’s Seagram murals is back on display after being vandalised with graffiti. The Art Newspaper, May 15, 2014

Venice

Guggenheim Refutes Criticism About Guggenheim Venice “The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation has issued a statement refuting the complaints of Peggy Guggenheim’s descendants as leveled in the current lawsuit filed over the operations of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice.” Artnet, May 15, 2014

Australia

Australia Slashes Arts Funding By $110M “More than $28 million will be cut from the Australia Council [for the Arts], $33.8m from arts programs ran by the Attorney-General’s department, $25.1m from Screen Australia and $9.4m from the indigenous languages support program.” Sydney Morning Herald, May 14, 2014

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